These family crests (In Japanese, KAMON) are called 'Tsuru-Mon' in Japan.

Since ancient times, cranes have been said to live for a thousand years, and were thus considered good omens of longevity. According to legend, there was a Japanese crane of great beauty that flew around with a hermit on its back.

Crane motifs became quite popular, especially in the Kamakura Period, and when the Kamakura shogunate dedicated swords to the shrine of each region in Japan, they were decorated with the pattern of a crane in a circle (tsuru-maru). Later, the crane pattern came to be widely used for family crests. (From 'Family Crests of Japan' ICG Muse, Inc.2001)

Facing white cranes Crane-shaped kanji
characters for Cho
Korin-style cranes
in shape of
balloon flower
Crane tortoise

Korin-style cranes
in shape of ivy leaf
Circle of
three cranes
Paper Crane Nanbu crane Crane circle,
encircled


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Family crest representing the crane

Crane-shaped
noshi circle
Crane-shaped
arrowhead
Crane-shaped
chrysanthemum
Crane-shaped
noshi

Crane-shaped
ginkgo leaf
Crane-shaped
ginkgo leaf
on circle
Nakamuraza Kabuki Crane-shaped
oak leaves

Bisected
crane-shaped
paulownias
Shadowed
crane-shaped
plum blossom
Crane-shaped
plum blossom
Crane-shaped
rice plant
Crane-shaped
rice plant

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